Homemade Fresh and Dried Bread Crumbs

This is an old recipe that should have been posted some time ago. Making your own bread crumbs is such an easy thing to do.  First I will start with fresh breadcrumbs which you might use in meatballs, meatloaf,  or to use in a recipe  such as stuffed peppers.

Remove all crusts from the bread; you can use any bread that is made without sweeteners, seeds or other items that would not make good bread crumbs.  Slightly stale bread is best and can be white or whole wheat.

Slice the bread into 1/2-inch thick slices, then cut into cubes.  Add these to your food processor and pulse until you have attained  the desired crumb size.

You can refrigerate fresh bread crumbs up to 5 days, or freeze up to 2 months in appropriate Ziploc bags or containers.  I recently used these in some meatballs.

 

Dried bread crumbs offer many choices such as plain or seasoned and are ideal for sprinkling over or layering in casserole dishes.

Preheat the oven to 375°F.  Slice the bread of your choice and arrange in one layer on a baking sheet.  Bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes.  Turn off the oven and prop the door open to let the bread dry more for about 15 minutes.

When the bread slices are cool, crush them with your hands and process in a food processor until you have coarse or fine crumbs.  Add your herbs and spices now if you want to season them; mix well.  These will keep for  1 week in the refrigerator and you can freeze for up to 3 months.

In addition to my recipes above I have included the “Cake Boss” family recipe.

Dried Breadcrumbs:

  • 2 loaves Italian bread, such as Pugliese (see comment below)
  • 1 cup pecorino Romano or Parmigiano-Reggiano, finely grated
  • 2 tbsp.  dried Italian herbs
  • 3 tbsp. dried parsley
  • 1/2 tbsp. fine sea salt

A few days before you plan to make the breadcrumbs, slice the bread into 1/2-inch slices.  Place the slices on cake racks and let air dry for 1 to 2 days.

Tear the bread into the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade.  Pulse the pieces to fine crumbs.

Combine the crumbs in a large bowl and stir in the cheese, Italian herbs, parsley and salt.  Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days, or freeze for up to 1 month.  Prior to using stir in a clove of minced garlic if desired.

Comment:  Well, I had to look Pugliese up as I do not recall ever hearing that name.   It is a popular Italian bread apparently, up there with focaccia and ciabatta.  The dough is similar to ciabatta actually which produces holes in the bread.

Fresh Breadcrumbs:

  • 12-inch loaf Italian bread, one day old
  • 1 large garlic clove, finely minced
  • 1 tbsp. parsley, finely minced
  • 1 tbsp. oregano, finely minced
  • 2 tbsp. pecorino Romano, finely grated
  • kosher salt and pepper to taste

The day before you make the breadcrumbs, slice the bread into 1/2-inch slices.  Place on a rack to dry overnight.

Tear up the bread slices into a food processor fitted with the steel blade; pulse to fine crumbs.

Put the breadcrumbs in a bowl and add the garlic, parsley, oregano and cheese.  Season with salt and pepper.

4 thoughts on “Homemade Fresh and Dried Bread Crumbs

  1. Great basic instructions. I’m sure these recipes are much tastier than the stuff in a canister or box from the grocery store. I look forward to making some soon.

    Like

  2. Thanks – I always have leftover bread and this is a good way to use it up. You can make it your own with the seasonings you add. I recently saw Buddy’s recipe and decided to add it and finally post this simple recipe 🙂

    Like

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